EYFS Update – Paediatric First Aid: are you compliant?

Early Years Record software for EYFS from Butterfly Print Ltd

 

 

All early years providers in England including maintained schools, non-maintained schools, independent schools, free schools, academies, providers on the Early Years Register and all providers registered with an early years childminder must be compliant with the new EYFS from the 3rd April 2017.

Early Years Record is built for nurseries and early years settings. It allows you to keep track of your compliance with legislation and guidance – including the most recent revision of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). Early Years Record tracks your safeguarding, child protection, health and safety, building and premises management against best practice from experts and Ofsted. All these updates and more will be in Early Years Record in time for the 3rd April!

What does the Early Years Foundation Stage say about first aid training?

In section 3 – The safeguarding and Welfare requirements, staff qualifications, support and skills tells us what is legally required in regards to first aid training. At least one person who has a current paediatric first aid (PFA) certificate must be on the premises and available at all times when children are present, and must accompany children on outings. The certificate must be for a full course consistent with the criteria set out in Annex A. (We will cover this further in this document) Childminders, and any assistant who might be in sole charge of the children for any period of time, must hold a full current PFA certificate. PFA training must be renewed every three years and be relevant for workers caring for young children and where relevant, babies. Providers should take into account the number of children, staff and layout of premises to ensure that a paediatric first aider is able to respond to emergencies quickly.

All newly qualified entrants to the early years workforce who have completed a level 2 and/or level 3 qualification on or after 30 June 2016, must also have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate within three months of starting work in order to be included in the required staff:child ratios at level 2 or level 3 in an early years setting. Providers should display (or make available to parents) staff PFA certificates or a list of staff who have a current PFA certificate.

What does this mean for “newly qualified entrants” into the workforce?

In this context, “newly qualified entrants” includes staff who have been apprentices or long term students who have gained a level 2 or level 3 early years qualification. Newly qualified entrants who started work between 30 June 2016 and 2 April 2017 must have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate by 2 July 2017 in order to be included in the required staff:child ratios at level 2 or level 3 in an early years setting. Newly qualified entrants who started work between 30 June 2016 and 2 April 2017 must have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate by 2 July 2017 in order to be included in the required staff:child ratios at level 2 or level 3 in an early years setting. Providers can make an exception to this requirement where a newly qualified entrant to the workforce is unable to gain a PFA certificate if a disability would prevent them from doing so. Such a newly qualified entrant can still be included in the staff:child ratios if otherwise competent to carry out their childcare duties. Where possible, such staff should attend a relevant PFA training course and obtain written evidence of attendance.

What will this mean in an Ofsted inspection?

Inspectors will want to see evidence that staff have received training in paediatric first aid that is consistent with the requirements within the EYFS. They will check that current certificates are within a 3-year period. They will cross reference the requirements to train newly qualified entrants into the early years workforce who are included in staff:child ratios.

Ofsted’s ‘Early Years Inspection Handbook’ for the Common Inspection Framework states that inspectors will gain evidence of;

the extent and range of completed training, including child protection, first aid and safeguarding training that fully meets statutory requirements, and its impact on improving children’s well-being.

Ofsted do not accredit or approve Paediatric First Aid training – they will inspect and make judgments based on the EYFS requirements and if these requirements have been adhered to within the setting. The EYFS recommends that providers share details of all staff with Paediatric First Aid qualifications with parents. This will be taken into account during inspections.

What does a paediatric first aid course need to cover in order to meet the requirements of the EYFS and to satisfy Ofsted?

Providers are responsible for identifying and selecting a competent training provider to deliver their PFA training. Training is available from a wide range of providers including: those who offer regulated qualifications; or the Voluntary Aid Societies (St John Ambulance, the British Red Cross and St Andrew’s First Aid who together are acknowledged by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) as one of the standardsetters for currently accepted first aid practice for first aid at work training courses); or those who operate under voluntary accreditation schemes; or one that is a member of a trade body with an approval and monitoring scheme; or those who operate independently of any such accreditation scheme. It may also be helpful to refer to HSE’s guidance about choosing a first aid training provider, which can be found at: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/geis3.htm.

Annex A in the EYFS covers the criteria for effective PFA training. It states that it needs to be:

  • Age appropriate for the children being cared for
  • Training needs to include an assessment of competence in order to award a certificate
  • The certificate must be renewed every three years
  • Equipment used in training needs to be adequate including baby and junior models, trainees must practice and demonstrate technique as part of the training

There are two courses mentioned and detailed in the EYFS:
Emergency PFA is undertaken face to face and lasts for a minimum of 6 hours. This has to cover the following areas:

  • Be able to assess an emergency situation and prioritise what action to take
  • Help a baby or child who is unresponsive and breathing normally
  • Help a baby or child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally
  • Help a baby or child who is having a seizure
  • Help a baby or child who is choking
  • Help a baby or child who is bleeding
  • Help a baby or child who is suffering from shock caused by severe blood loss (hypovolemic shock)

Full PFA should last for a minimum of 12 hours and cover the areas in Emergency PFA and the following areas:

  • Help a baby or child who is suffering from anaphylactic shock
  • Help a baby or child who has had an electric shock
  • Help a baby or child who has burns or scalds
  • Help a baby or child who has a suspected fracture
  • Help a baby or child with head, neck or back injuries
  • Help a baby or child who is suspected of being poisoned
  • Help a baby or child with a foreign body in eyes, ears or nose
  • Help a baby or child with an eye injury
  • Help a baby or child with a bite or sting
  • Help a baby or child who is suffering from the effects of extreme heat or cold
  • Help a baby or child having: a diabetic emergency; an asthma attack; an allergic reaction; meningitis; and/or febrile convulsions
  • Understand the role and responsibilities of the paediatric first aider (including appropriate contents of a first aid box and the need for recording accidents and incidents)

Providers should consider whether paediatric first aiders need to undertake annual refresher training, during any three-year certification period to help maintain basic skills and keep up to date with any changes to PFA procedures.

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